Trying To Get Pregnant Again After a Miscarriage: 7 Practical Tips from Experts

Updated: Oct 30

An estimated 1 in 10-20 (i.e.10-20%) pregnancies end in early miscarriage (RCOG). Losing a baby is devastating for those who experience loss. 


Miscarriage is demanding both physically and emotionally. Many women worry about trying again after miscarriage, which is understandable because they worry about the ability of their body to conceive again and to maintain a pregnancy. 


Keep reading to learn practical tips and obtain valuable support when trying again after miscarriage.





Quick bites


  • It's entirely normal to experience a variety of emotions when you've been affected by a miscarriage. You may be angry, low, sad or you may feel entirely ok and ready to get started again as soon as possible. A miscarriage is a loss of your baby so allow yourself ample time to acknowledge your loss and to grieve. 


  • You may want to consider getting external support from a bereavement counsellor or a miscarriage support group.


  • If you or your partner have persistent feelings of fear, worry, low mood and lack of motivation, or wanting to self-harm it’s important to be assessed by a healthcare professional. You can complete a mood assessment online and self-refer to Improving Access to Psychological Therapies, you can contact your GP or call NHS 111. 


  • As much as possible, take time for self-care. Miscarriage is not only demanding emotionally but physically too. Please look after yourself. 


  • In most cases, women who are trying again after miscarriage will have a normal, healthy pregnancy the next time around. Having one or two miscarriages does not increase your risk of having another miscarriage. Focus on self-care and optimising your health during your pregnancy.


  • Your cycle may return to normal straight away after you've had a complete miscarriage or may take a few months to settle, especially if you have had an evacuation procedure or if it's taken some weeks to complete the miscarriage. 


  • If you feel emotionally and physically ready to do so, and as long as you haven't been advised by the doctor to delay, you can start trying again as soon as you want. 


  • Friends and family members can find information on how to support someone who has experienced pregnancy loss at the end of this article. 


Recovering from a Miscarriage


It's entirely normal to experience a variety of emotions when you have had a miscarriage. You might feel sad, low or angry. You may have a delayed reaction,  you may grieve for a short period of time or you may not have a grief reaction at all and want to just move forward. 


When trying again after a miscarriage, you should do what feels right for you and allow yourself ample time to acknowledge what has happened. If you need to do so, take time to grieve the loss of your child and grieve on the life you had envisaged with your baby. You do not have to feel alone and may want to consider one-to-one counselling, counselling with your partner or group counselling.


You may want to do something to remember your baby. You can find some helpful tips here.


Every person grieves differently, so there is no definitive answer regarding when you should start trying again after a miscarriage. It is recommended that you wait until bleeding has stopped before having intercourse, as there is a higher risk of infection. Otherwise, you should be able to start trying to conceive again before your next period if you choose. 



If you or your partner have persistent feelings of fear, worry, low mood and lack of motivation, or wanting to self-harm it’s important to see a healthcare professional as soon as possible. 


*If you are ever unsure, speak to your healthcare professional (GP or Practice Nurse) or call NHS111*



Mood Self-Assessment Online


This link will connect you to a Mood assessment questionnaire on NHS.UK that will take a few minutes to complete. The outcome of the assessment will guide you on whether any action needs to be taken.  



Self-referral to Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT)


In England, patients can self-refer to a local talking therapies service, 'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) ' provided by the NHS. IAPT offer evidence-based psychological therapies to support people with mental health problems including anxiety and depression.


A questionnaire on the website can be completed and an initial assessment arranged by phone. Afterwards, depending on the outcome of your assessment, talking therapies may be offered, in person, phone or online.


The website for the local IAPT service can be found by clicking on this link, entering your postcode and locating the page for self-referral.




How Long After a Miscarriage Can I Try Again?


Technically, if you feel emotionally and physically ready to do so, and as long as you haven't been advised by the doctor to delay, you can start trying as soon as you want. This includes during your first menstrual cycle following a miscarriage.


Your cycle may return to normal straight away after you've had a complete miscarriage or may take a few months to settle, especially if you have had an evacuation procedure or if it's taken some weeks to complete the miscarriage. 


This article on the NHS website concludes that getting pregnant sooner after miscarriage does not lead to greater adverse outcomes compared to waiting for more than six months.


Just like any cycle, the highest chance for pregnancy occurs during your fertile period which can be up to 5 days before you ovulate and approximately 12-24 hours after you ovulate.


You can speak to or see your Practice Nurse or GP for a preconception review and discussion. 


Are There Reasons to Wait Before Getting Pregnant Again?


Once you and your partner are physically and emotionally ready enough to attempt another pregnancy, you should be clear to do so in most cases. However, there are certain health conditions that make waiting advisable before trying again. These include ectopic pregnancy, molar pregnancy, and illnesses or infection following the miscarriage.


If you have had a late miscarriage or recurrent miscarriages, you may want to wait until you have seen a specialist and been investigated. If you are concerned with trying again after a miscarriage, you can discuss these concerns with your doctor. He or she will be able to tell you whether or not to wait before attempting your next pregnancy.


Trying Again After Miscarriage: Will I Miscarry Again?


Recurrent miscarriage, defined as having three or more miscarriages in consecutive pregnancies, affects 1 in 100 (1%) women (NHS) who are trying to conceive. As you can see, recurrent miscarriage affects significantly fewer couples. In most cases, women who are trying again after miscarriage will have a normal, healthy pregnancy the next time around.


Unfortunately, there is no way to guarantee that miscarriage won't occur with the next pregnancy. To help improve the chances, it's best to focus on self-care and pregnancy health. Follow any advice provided by your healthcare professional and ensure you take any prescribed medication or recommended over the counter supplements.


Here are a few tips for a healthy pregnancy:

  • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated throughout the day.

  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet.

  • Limit refined sugar, processed foods, and caffeine.

  • Maintain a healthy body weight.

  • Schedule regular visits with appropriate health professionals such as your doctor, midwife, nurse, counsellor, fertility coach or dietician.

  • Undertake at least 15-20 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise daily.

  • Avoid alcohol, drugs, and nicotine.

  • Take a daily supplement with 400mcg of folic acid. Take 10mcg vitamin D in the winter months or all year round if you have dark skin. 

  • Get adequate sleep.

  • Do what you can to reduce your stress levels and look after your mental health ( also see information The Miscarriage Association).

Overall, there is a greater chance that you won't miscarry again and having one or two miscarriages does not increase your risk of having another miscarriage. (Tommys)








Becoming pregnant again after miscarriage


When you become pregnant after miscarriage you may feel more anxious than you would have done in your previous pregnancy. As much as possible, try to maintain a positive mindset, look after your physical and mental health (see section above that includes tips for a healthy pregnancy).


If you want to do so, tell a close trusted family member or friend who will be able to help you with chores so you can rest or just to provide emotional support.


This publication from The Miscarriage Association provides information to women who are pregnant after experiencing previous loss. 


You may find it helpful to have an early pregnancy ultrasound scan around the 8-10 weeks gestation. This is a personal choice and can provide reassurance but is not a guarantee that you won’t miscarry. Some NHS early pregnancy services will provide this service particularly if you have had recurrent miscarriages. However many will not so you may decide to arrange a private scan. 


Miscarriage Research


Tommy's funds research across the UK, aiming to find the causes for pregnancy complications and pregnancy loss.


You may be able to directly participate in research. Alternatively you can donate or become involved in other ways. Find out more here.

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Information Resources


For Family, Friends and Colleagues

Supporting someone you know after pregnancy loss, The Miscarriage Association


Pregnancy after Miscarriage, Tommys


Find a number of organisations that provide information and support here (The Baby Loss Awareness Alliance)



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